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at least 16 suspected taliban fighters in northern pakistan. it comes days after another drone attack killed a senior tribal leader in the area. pakistani intelligence opposites say three taliban hideouts were targeted. there are reports 10 taliban fighters were among the dead. more now from islamabad. >> in the region there's an identification of the u.s. drone strike, latest drone strike happening in the south region and predominantly tribal area. according to the reports, at least three compounds were hit. intelligence reports indicate that there were a number of fighters but there are no clear indications as to who the other victims were. in report there's have been a number of attacks in the tribal areas, which have become extremely unpopular because hundreds of civilians have also been killed in the attack. the attack happened at the time when pakistan is close to an election and there's tremendous opposition against a continued cia-operated drone strike. >> police in northern ireland are on high alert after three nights of rioting in belfast. pro-british protestants are stating
of the taliban. i think that was a major mistake. the second was to allow the coalition we successfully built for the war and the peace conference disintegrate. iran had been helpful, rebuffed offers of further help. pakistan had at least been not actively and helpful but we failed to keep them up to that standard in the succeeding years. the third error which i failed to perceive was a failure to pursue reconciliation much earlier than we finally did. there were certain proportion of the taliban leadership that were prepared to be coopted and that would have collaborated new arrangements and instead we send them to guantanamo and send very negative signals to those who might consider coopting and being coopted into the new system and it took us almost a decade to reverse that policy. nevertheless, despite these problems and despite the fact that now more than ten years on, we are still engaged in a counterinsurgency campaign. we have come a long way than many of us realize and i think some of this is reflected in a recent poll the asia society put out a couple weeks ago which showed in disti
responsibility in the aftermath of the fall of the taliban. i think that was a major mistake. the second was to allow the coalition we had successfully built for the war and for the peace conference to disintegrate. iran had been very helpful. week rebuffed offers of further help. pakistan had at least then not actively and helpful. but we failed to keep them up to that standard in the succeeding years. the third error which i failed to perceive was a failure to pursue reconciliation much earlier than we finally did. there were a certain proportion of the taliban leadership that were prepared to be cooperative, that would have collaborated. instead, we sent them to guantanamo, and sent a negative signal to those who might consider who being coopted into the new system. it took us almost a decade to reverse that policy. nevertheless, despite these problems, and despite the fact that now, more than 10 years on, we are still engaged in a counterinsurgency campaign in afghanistan, i think we have come a longer way than many of us realize. some of this is reflected in a recent poll the asia s
in 2009. taliban will be given a seat at table and allowed to open an office in qatar. the taliban must first renounce terrorism. >> bret: we talked about what the troop number will be at the end of 2014. what is the going thinking on that. what about the concern about protecting those troops if the number is very low? >> well, absolutely. what we have confirmed is general john allen, the top commanderrer in afghanistan given the national security team around the president three options. 9,000 option, 6,000 option. and 3,000 option. the president will likely decide on 3,000 to 6,000 troops and that will not give you much option in terms of the training and assisting the afghanistan security forces. they will set up bases to deal with al-qaeda if fringe area along the border. >> bret: we'll follow it. jennifer griffin at the pentagon. thank you. do you think the president should speed up the process of having afghan take control of the security? let me know on twitter. to me at bret baier. the politics, west virginia senator rockefeller will not seek a sixth term. the leader of the congr
to shape where the taliban goes because, of course, its internal issue is that the afghan taliban began to actually seed and grow in insurgency inside pakistan that they had to deal with, and i think that's fundamental. the troops on the ground don't necessarily help us solve that problem. other issues, money and other elements of state, will help us influence pakistan. >> what do we know about conversations between the karzai regime and the taliban, the negotiations in france? >> well, president karzai during our interview said that they are currently still in negotiations and talking to the taliban, but there hasn't been any proof that they actually have been because the taliban themselves they send emails and talk to us on the phone as journalists and they tell us that in no way will they talk to what they call the puppet regime of america, referring to president karzai in his government, but the afghan officials that we speak to, they say that they are currently talking to the taliban, but they may be. we just don't know what level of the taliban that they're talking to. >> i know t
army. despite the billions spent and the thousands of lives lost, the taliban has not been defeated. some say at the america pulls out too quickly, it will be trade promises made and leave afghanistan vulnerable. >> it will be difficult to engage down the road if there is a large al qaeda return or the taliban takes over the country, to get the afghanistan's to trust us when we say we will be there to help you. >> america described it as the final chapter in afghanistan. president obama downsized out of the ambitions, winding down the war that is increasingly unpopular at home. this is not the final chapter. that is just that americans have grown wary about spending the money and spilling the blood. >>> for more on the future of the u.s. mission, i spoke a short time ago with the former u.s. ambassador to afghanistan. ambassador, thank you very much for coming in. president obama says that things are going so well he can actually speed up the transition. are the afghan security forces really ready to take over in the spring or is this more a matter of expediency for both countries?
fatah supporters are holding their first major rally since 2007. pakistani teenager shot of the taliban leaves the hospital where she has been treated. welcome to "bbc world news. i'm david eades. also, coming up, concern over president hugo chavez's health. he has a severe lung infection in three weeks after cancer surgery. and a present in afghanistan, a dramatic transformation of one of afghanistan's most notorious and jails. prison in afghanistan. hello. thanks for joining us. another scene of devastation in syria. a car bomb exploded at a petrol station in the capital damascus, killing at least nine people and wounding many more. state media said the bomb targeted cars that were lined up to get patrol and they say the attack was carried out by what they call terrorists. opposition activists are preferring to blame the government. the blast took place in a northern district of the capital. jon donnison has this report. >> this is all that was left of the petrol station after what is thought to have been a car bomb attack. it is likely drivers would have been lining up for fuel, whic
their camps. taliban infiltration is often to blame. the tactic is to undermine the relationship between afghan forces and the coalition partners, making it more difficult for the afghan military to take over security here. president karzai arrived in washington today. mapping out afghanistan's future after foreign combat troops have left. their meeting will determine the primary mission, to fight the taliban or to get rid of al qaeda. president karzai wants soldiers. his forces lead emissions across the country. they are still not ready. for many years to come, these soldiers in afghanistan generally will rely on america's support. >> for more on those meetings taking place, i spoke with peter bergen. what is the main sticking point in these meetings between what the white house wants and what president karzai wants? >> it is the question of immunity for american forces. the u.s. does not want its soldiers being prosecuted by an afghan accords for obvious reasons. this is a big sticking point. >> karzai would like that? >> yes. that is very much what he would like. and then there is the
mobilization to fight rebels. you are watching al jazeera. here are the top stories. suspected taliban fighters are among 16 killed in the u.s. drone strikes in pakistan. loyalists battled riot police in northern ireland in a dispute over the british union flag. the egyptian president shuffles the cabinet of the country faces economic turmoil. this is the first time president assad has offered a comprehensive plan to end the conflict in syria. the crowds chanted "we will defend you" as he entered. adjusted a conference of reconciliation -- he suggested a conference of reconciliation and a new constitution. >> this is what is going to preserve syria in the future and its politics and economics. in order to agree on new laws to protect and run the parties. we will have a referendum. thirdly, we have an expanded government which carries out the national charter. fourthly, we will put it to the people in the conference of dialogue to agree to the laws, including a loss for election. anything to do with the constitution and law, people can say in the conference of dialogue if the government can carr
after nearly being killed by the taliban. tonight she's walking and inspiring people around the world. >>> and what's wrong with this picture? what happened after the women of the hill posed for a photo and why it's getting so much attention tonight. "nightly news" begins now. >>> from nbc news world headquarters in new york, this is "nbc nightly news" with brian williams. >> good evening, i'm lester holt in tonight for brian, who will be back monday. a lot of americans are spending this first week of the new year flat on their backs, taken down by the flu in numbers we typically wouldn't see until much later in the winter. and according to the centers for disease control, those numbers are rapidly climbing with a peak nowhere in sight. the government reports as of a week ago, flu cases were widespread in 41 states. that's 10 more states and a week earlier. what's more, this flu strain appears to be a particularly nasty one. it's even proven deadly in a handful of cases involving the young. nbc's chief science correspondent robert bazell starts us off tonight with more. >> have you ha
as taliban momentum, and to give ourselves a bridge force to give us time to build up afghan security forces did i reluctantly come to the conclusion we're going to need more western forces, probably mostly american. we came up with detailed analysis on what we had to secure to be effective, and the requirement was for 40,000 forces. and so we recommended that which followed not long after our strategic assessment. >> rose: after the number of troops had already come in because of mckernen. >> yes. some of those forces hadn't yet arrived. >> rose: then you went to london. >> yes. >> rose: and you make a speech. the speech is okay. then there's a q&a session. >> yes. >> rose: and you say what. >> rose: i went to london at the request of the british government to engage parts of both their media and their government to explain the strategy. at that time we were executing a strategy that i had derived a mission strategy i derived from president obama's public statements his speeches in the spring when he authorized more forces and my understanding of what it is my mission was which had beg
now but i would say when i arrived in 2002 in afghanistan, pretty early after the fall of the taliban, the country was devastated physically and traumatized sipsychologically. it was literally a basket case. didn't know which way was up. normal was everything before 1978. people couldn't remember normal. they've made a loving progret o. there are girls in school. it's imperfect but now they're scared because there's a lot to lose now. they had this kchaotic 34 year and they don't want to lose it. it isn't numbers of people but it's a relationship that gives them the confidence that we'll are enough of a partner that if they need our help -- not thousands of troops and no billions of dollars -- >> but some sort of relationship. >> some relationship. >> how do you have that when you have afghan forces killing nato forces and personnel? >> there's a lot of mistrust. >> now we stop going on patrols with these guys. >> for a period they did but in reality, again, if you use the anecdote to prove the whole, sometimes it's not true. the wider story is more complex. you've been there. there's
in the world. the taliban controlled the region and this is the environment that the marines came into in 2009 and subsequently it has stabilized significantly since then. so the primary mission of marines in southwest afghanistan is security. but our secondary mission is to assist our interagency partners in kick starting institutions that contribute to a stable nation state. as an educator i joined the team to oversee the portfolio of education and was given the opportunity to implement the country's education strategic plan over the southwest provinces. additionally i was given the national action plan for women and control of two female engagement teams which were marines trained to interact with the population of women because of the pashi culture, the males were not allowed to interact with the women. in order obviously to ensure communities stay strong you have to not only address the men, but you absolutely need to address the women. so we created the female engagement team. with our interagency partners, the u.s. department of state, danish and british governments and of course the
arrived in 2002 in afghanistan, pretty early after the fall of the taliban, the country was devastated physically. and traumatized psychologically, it was literally a basket case, didn't know what was up. and normal was before 1978, that was 24 years at the time. people couldn't remember normal. they made a lot of progress. there are girls in school. there is progress, greater places. there is progress, it is imperfect. now they're scared. they're scared of 2014 because there is a all riglot to lose n they had chaos for 34 years, and the afghan people don't want to lose it. i think what the afghan people want from the u.s. and the west is strategic partnership, not numbers but a relationship that gives them a confidence that we are enough of a partner that if they need our help, not thousands of troops, maybe not even billions of dollars. >> but some sort of presence. >> some sort of presence and some sort of relationship. >> but how do you have that relationship when you have afghan soldiers and police killing u.s. nato forces and utilize personnel, there is a huge amount of distrust,
pursuing peace talks with the taliban. as part of that process, the karzai government has urged pakistan to release more taliban fighters. four were freed last week after more than two dozen were released in the past few months. whatever comes of the peace efforts, president karzai said again today, he plans to step down next year. >> certainly, i will be a retired president and very happily in retirement. >> woodruff: karzai has been dogged by charges of fraud since his re-election, part of larger concerns about corruption in his government. he acknowledged the concerns today, and said he hopes for a proper election to name his successor. >> brown: we pick up on today's meeting with two men with extensive experience in managing u.s.-afghan relations. said jawad was afghanistan's ambassador to washington from 2003 to 2010. before that, he was president karzai's chief of staff. and peter tomsen was a career diplomat who served as special envoy on afghanistan during the george h.w. bush administration. he's the author of "the wars of afghanistan." peter tomsen, let's start with you. what j
on the type of targeting that is permissable if the u.s. helps pakistan with the pakistani taliban, then perhaps the u.s. can get away with its own targeting list. >> this strike raises two issues. there are questions about the legality of u.s. jone strikes -- drone strikes on pakistan and the ambivalent idea that there are good taliban and less good. ardo you think those issues will come up again? >> on legal issues it is ambiguous. the pakistan government says they don't want drone strikes but if it works out at a practical level they may accept them if there is joint targeting. >> this has happened before. and the u.s. has gone back to not acknowledging they are operating the drones. that is what they have re- introduced. and the question of good and bad taliban, if there is a chaotic civil war in afghanistan after the transition of coalition forces it will be bad for afghanistan but a disaster for pakistan. >> a man described as an al- qaeda operative in great britain was sent to the u.s. nazir was accused of planning to set off bombs in manchester but the fbi believes he is pa
the persistent taliban insurgency in afghanistan. friday's meeting between karzai and president obama seems difficult with the competing agendas both leaders have to juggle. we have more. >> reporter: the number of troops in the afghan military is growing, but they are not ready for the mission to control the security of the country after 2014. experts warn that unless international forces say longer, afghanistan risks falling back into a state of civil war with the taliban, but u.s. public opinion is stacked against the long war. americans want their troops to come home as soon as possible. and with increasing attention on the u.s. budget deficit, the campaign is seen as increasingly unaffordable. u.s. media has reported that the white house is considering reducing the number of troops that remain in afghanistan to below 10,000. u.s. deputy national security adviser, ben row said on tuesday that a total withdrawal remains an option. that announcement caused anger among people in afghanistan. >> translator: if all u.s. troops leave afghanistan after 2014, it will be civil war again. we exp
name malvi, a taliban commander. as far as i could tell, it was a perfectly legal and good thing to do, but the blowback on the ground is something that -- can be furious and last friday i was at the pentagon talking to the joint chiefs legal advisor who we talked about this at length. one of the things that they try to do as they analyze and propose strike, what's the blowback going to be. >> on the ground. >> on the ground. you can hit a guy in the house, but if all the neighbors -- if that causes them to go join the taliban, you know, you have taken a big step backwards. he was trying to persuade me that they pay attention to that when they're looking at a proposed strike, but the problem is how can do you that from washington? very, very difficult. the evidence so far is in yemen, for example, enormous blowback. you know, the analysis that i've seen is that we've caused more harm than good there. >> ben, i wonder, the other -- there is blowback regionally, but there has been such a lack of discussion here, and i remember the "new york times" kill list story that raised hackles in t
, you face different levels of [inaudible] the province is quiet. the taliban are not operating. there's less threat against you and your family. therefore despite the inferences being made, we still have challenges to recruit a member -- members of the security forces from those provinces. we purposely go and try to recruit students from the south or places [indiscernible] since the school system was not to this standard, i does not matter. we're not successful to bring them as much as we want. >> do you want to talk about these issues? >> in terms of who revises the afghan national army, in 2001, we had a plethora of offers. the pakistani, the indian, and the iranian fradkin to me and said it wanted to collaborate. i thought that we ought to try to devise some arrangement in which i and some limited aspects, countries could participate. others in the administration were opposed to any iranian role. relations between pakistan and india were at a nadir. coins and with 9/11 and the subsequent bond process, a pakistani base -- terrorist group had conducted a large- scale terrorist attack
said the taliban and al qaeda are two different elements. if we stay after killing bin laden, we have lost our purpose. he said the worst thing we can do is get bogged down without getting out. it wasn't that long ago, but it was interesting to look back a year and eight months ago to when bin laden was killed. i mean, at the time, anybody else think that maybe that would have meant we would come home from afghanistan? it seemed like one of the real possibilities that opened up with that almost unbelievable news on that cold night in may. but we did not leave afghanistan after this happened. this was roughly 600 days ago. we've got another 700 days ahead of us before the white house says this war will officially end, nearly two years from now. but how many american troops are left there between now and then? and what are those troops expected to do? how much fighting are they going to be doing? how much of our 11 and a half yearlong war is going to continue to result in americans getting hurt and killed between now and then? all of that remains to be decided. what is going to happen i
assassinated for challenging the taliban has gotten out of the hospital. we'll tell you about her story up next. >>> she challenged the taliban and nearly died for. it well, tonight the teenage pakistani girl who survived an assassination attempt is out of a pressure hospital. >> rita nissan -- out of auburn hospital. >> rita nissan has the story. >> reporter: 15-year-old malala walked slowly but steadily holding a nurse's hand as she left the hospital. she hugged and thanked the medical staff and waved good- bye almost three months after a taliban gunman shot her in the head at point blank range. the shooting happened in northwest pakistan. the taliban attacked malala leaving school. the terror group targeted the teenager because she openly challenged the taliban's efforts to deny education and other rights to women. malala was flown to queen elizabeth hospital in birmingham which has treated hundreds of soldiers injured in the wars in afghanistan and iraq. malala will continue to come to this hospital for outpatient therapy. in a few weeks from now she'll be readmitted here for reconstructiv
the taliban out of their holds. today, most major cities and most afghans are more secure than insurgents have continued to lose territory. meanwhile, afghan forces continue to grow stronger. as planned, some 352,000 afghan soldiers and police are now in training or on duty. most missions are already being led by afghan forces. and of all the men and women in uniform in afghanistan, the vast majority are afghans who are fighting and dying for their country every day. we still face significant challenges. but because this progress, our transition is on track. at the n.a.t.o. summit last year, we agreed with our coalition partners that after beg afghan forces in 2013. the president has been here and we've consulted with coalition partners and continue to do so. today we agreed that as afghan forces take the lead and as president karzai announces the final phase of the transition, coalitions forces will move to a support role this spring. our troops will continue to fight alongside afghan forces as needed, but starting this spring our troops will have a different mission, training, advising, assi
the fall of the taliban the country was devastated physically and traumatized psychologically. it was a basket case. and normal was everything before 1978. that was 23 years at the time and now it is 34. people couldn't remember normal. they have made a lot of progress. there are girls in school. it is imperfect and now they are scared of 2014 because there is a lot to lose now and they had this chaotic 34 years and the afghan people don't want to lose it. i think instead of just troop numbers what the afghan people want is a partnership which is a relationship that gives them the confidence that we are enough of a partner that if they need our help, not thousands of troops not even billions of dollars but some sort of presence and relationship. >> how do you have that relationship when you have afghan soldiers and police killing nato forces and u.s. personal? i mean there is a huge amount of distress probably more than there has ever been. >> we have to work through that. >> our whole program is building up afghan security forces and yet now we stop going on patrol with these
, it is not possible to reconcile without the taliban renouncing terrorism, without them recognizing the afghan constitution and recognizing that if there are changes that they want to make to how the afghan government operates, then there is an orderly constitutional process to do that and that you can't resort to violence. the afghan constitution protects the rights of afghan women. and the united states strongly believes that afghanistan cannot succeed unless it gives opportunity to its women. we believe that about every country in the world. and so, you know, we will continue to voice very strongly support for the afghan constitution, protection of minorities, its protection of women and we think that a failure to provide that protection, not only will make reconciliation impossible to achieve, but also, would make afghan -- afghanistan's long-term development impossible to achieve. you know? the single best indicator or one of the single best indicators of a country's prosperity around the world is how does it treat its women? does it educate that half of the population? does it give them
-- liberating afghanistan from an invasion and a rule by the taliban. the first one, in reverse order, the first one freeing afghanistan happened within a month and a half to two months. subbing squect of that afghanistan began its journey towards democracy, the rule of law, progress in all aspects of life. it went all right. it went reasonablely good under the circumstances. without a doubt with the help of the united states and our other allies around the world. the second part, freeing us all from terrorism and radicalism, didn't work as swiftly as we expected. there was bumps along the road and setbacks. now, the afghan people regardless where they stand recognize that afghanistan could not have made the progress that we have made in the past 10 years without the help we received from our allies. led by the united states of america. in more cruder terms the u.s. taxpayer's money. it contributed to afghanistan's upliftment. it contributed to the workplace, to society, to policy, the return of young girls to education. the return of universities, roads, communications, mobile phones, computers
about is that from our perspective, it is not possible to reconcile without the taliban renouncing terrorism, without them recognizing the afghan constitution, and recognizing that if there are changes that they want to make to how the afghan government operates, then there is an orderly constitutional process to do that, and you can't resort to violence. the afghan constitution protects the rights of afghan women. and the united states strongly believes that afghanistan cannot succeed unless it gives opportunity to its women. we believe that about every country in the world. and so, you know, we will continue to voice very strongly support for the afghan constitution, its protection of minorities, its protection of women, and we think that a failure to provide that protection, not only will make reconciliation impossible to achieve, but also would make afghan -- afghanistan's long-term development impossible to achieve. the single best indicator or one of the single best indicators of a country's prosperity around the world is how does it treat its women. does it educate that half
will the taliban plal in the future of that country. and what role will the united states play after we end our combat mission? how many troops will we keep behind in afghanistan to keep that country secure if we can? jim moran is a democrat congressman from virginia and westmore is a retired army captain and author of "the other wes moore. i guess the question comes down to numbers. 66,000 troops in country right now. what should be it be five years from now. >> i think we're going to initially withdraw to 6,000 troops in 2014. i think a lot of work will be done by contractors, not u.s. troops, but we can't afford to continue spending the kind of money we're spending. you know, we have spent $557 billion up to today, half a trillion dollars, and what have we gotten for it? burma, somalia, and afghanistan are the three most corrupt nations in the world, and now almost 90% of that corruption is coming from american taxpayers' money. you'd be shocked at the amount of american taxpayers' money that's being spent over in dubai because it came in to afghanistan. this is a nation that's -- a governme
and taliban takeover. as for president karzai, he said he would like to see levels around 15,000 but today suggested numbers are less important than u.s. cooperation and supplying the them with tanks and drones. how much will it all cost? already the u.s. and allies pledged $16 billion in civilian aid and military ops on top of $642 billion the u.s. spent since 9/11 and 2,100 u.s. lives lost. let's start with kristen welker. what are you hearing came out of the meeting? >> reporter: a couple of headlines out of today's meeting. the withdrawal plans have been accelerated a bit. both announcing that u.s. troops handing over control to afghan forces this spring. that is a few months earlier than expected so that means that u.s. troops will shift their role in afghanistan. they will be taking on a role of advising, assisting and training afghan forces. president obama making it very clear, though, u.s. troops will still be in harm's way if they continue to be in the country. the big question mark remanes, how many troops are in afghanistan after 2014? today, president obama not answering that
have problems with the taliban. the u.s. does believe there has been considerable problem with the influence of the taliban on afghan cause political culture. >> in venezuela, military jets give the salute to president hugo chavez. he was supposed to be sworn in for a fourth term on thursday but remains in cuba, where he is recovering from cancer surgery. that did not stop thousands of supporters and regional leaders from taking part in a rally in the capital. >> i am chavez was the message on the streets. thousands of people gathered to show their support for the man they called their commander. thursday should have been inauguration day, but it turns into a show of force for the party. >> we love chavez. we know he is our leader. he has given to venezuela all his love. he has given our country the respect it has lost. >> people are hoping the president will recover. chavez is still in cuba after undergoing his fourth cancer surgery. there has been an ongoing debate about who is running the country. >> we came here to defend the constitution, that says he can be sworn in
the taliban have bombed more than 400 mostly girls schools and it's travesty. what's amazing if you go back, they've been written off the government records and not getting funding but some kids are still trying go to school in these villages and i think we owe to those brave children to help those kids finish school and don't worry about the, i.e.d counts but worry about those brave children still trying go to school. this is a school we opened up in 1998. 12 girls in the front row. i asked them to increase it by ten percent a year of the they don't know how to do they're math there. this is what happened one year later. now there's two rows of girls going to school here. this is on the far left in the back, silver beard is the first man to get an education in this school and his story is in the book. incredible story how he left the va ladies and gentlemen and his father booted him across the river and said don't come back until you get your education so he did this and he walked into this urban area and everybody was looking at him if you ask most men there in the back, what's the most p
be an option that would probably lead to an afghan government under pressure from taliban, perhaps, al qaeda. you know the world in a vacuum i think that would start to leave a vacuum by the government to be filled by taliban for sure and result in afghanistan that is found before the turn of the century. >> you would recommend against it? >> if i were still in office yes, i would. i think there's potential in afghanistan to make the place a lot more secure with the afghan forces but it will take more time than we have currently. >> why do you think the white house may see it differently? >> i think part of it is there's always a tension between getting afghans to take responsibility for their own actions, and making sure they're doing all they can and not overly relying on u.s. and allied forces. i think part of what we're seeing is playing out probably in the media here is to put some pressure on the karzai government to be realistic about their expectations and make sure afghans are doing all they can to ensure their own security. >> what might come out of the karzai
weeks with u.s. special forces hunting taliban militants. good afternoon. >> hi, how are you doing? >> shepard: he blames us for everything. why in the world would the president talk to him? >> you have to watch his game. he is looking forward to releasing all of the 3,000 or so prisoners while u.s. forces are busy putting them in jail. he knows he will not get the north so he decided to bring the taliban back into the government. these things won't be discussed too openly as he begs president obama to keep troops there and i think he will have to relent on the u.s. troops being is subject to afghan law because we will just pull out of there. >> shepard: the goal has been the most recent goal in a series of goals in afghanistan has been to put afghan security forces back in charge of things. you have are been over there for five weeks looking at it. how is that going? >> very badly. the army and the police are one of the main problems they have because they are causing problems in the more remote regions. when i was there we had a group of u.s. trained afghan police battling u.s. t
night raids to kill and capture taliban leaders. you have to do that from multiple bases . these options will not be able to be fulfilled and meet those obligations . >> a recent pentagon report shows that one of afghan army 23 brigades was able to operate without military support from the u.s. or nato. you expect it to improve by 2014? >> i think the whole engagement is catastrophic and you look at the harvest of what we have done and look at sacrifices of the last 12 years now we had in afghanistan. we don't have much to show for it. we have a karzai as president . dysfunctional units that made habits . the afghan sold yirs were killing our own people and hundreds of billions later, the the fatalities and casuallies. it is it a good wor. but there is nothing good about the war. the chaos will claim afghanistan and the taliban will claim afghanistan and our work will have been for naught. >> that is it a sobering picture that you paint there. thank you for your insight. i appreciate it >> you, too. >> and rebel sitings are pressing ahead with fencive. there is a car boiming in damascus
troops. and more concerning is to have the allies negotiate with the taliban? >> i am disappointed. he said it is a responsible war then his actions i think indicate pretreat. leaving earlier and removing u.s. troops and the objective was not to solidify this seems they know when they can come back. >> not surprisingly i disagree. we're probably pulling out somewhat to quickly. but you have to negotiate with your enemy. i cannot believe that haida is inclusive of the taliban. but if we can have them agree to terms with violence , a supportive democratization we cannot afford to say no negotiation ? >> i am not as optimistic. there is no way to negotiate. the idea of the taliban office and patter? -- katar? we are cutting out too early. that is what this president does. if we don't fight this war the way it needs to be fought, a stop shedding blood the president was never in this to win. lori: what about the war in afghanistan was it worth the time? >> for me to say that it is not worth the lives lost is to disparage them but unfortunately i wish it was fought by generals visited bureau
afghanistan to launch attacks against our country. at the same time, we pushed the taliban out of their strongholds. today, most major cities and most afghans are more secure and insurgents continue to lose territory. afghan forces continue to grow stronger, meanwhile. as planned, some 352,000 afghan soldiers and police are now in training or on duty. most missions are already being led by afghan forces. of all the men and women in uniform in afghanistan, the vast majority are afghans who are fighting and dying for their country every day. we still face significant challenges, but because this progress our transition is on track. last year we agreed with partners that afghan forces will take the lead for security in mid 2013. president karzai and his team have been here for several days, we have consulted with our coalition partners, and we will continue to do so, and today we agreed that as afghan forces take the lead and as president karzai announces the final phase of the transition, coalition forces will move to a support role this spring. our troops will continue to fight
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